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When spam gets hella-strange

Since I run a Tigrigna language teaching website, I get a lot of emails from many different people who are (like myself) amateur Tigrigna language enthusiasts; but this latest e-mail is the first spam-bot email I have ever received. It’s very bizarre, so I hope you find some humour in it….

***emailremoved@yahoo.com***

Am Juliet,a tall good looking young girl,so lovely
and caring with good understanding.fair in complexion,care with good
sharing,honesty.I saw your ad at ***a random Ethiopian website that I removed*** which interested me much
and i decided to contact you.I really want to have a good friendship with you
even if you have married we can be friend ok ,i have a reason of
selecting you as my friend,pls if you wish to know more.Pls contact me
through this my id We need to talk and
know ourself more and equally share pictures to each other.hope to hear
from you.

Bye with a warmly
huggs.
Juliet

Linguistically, I am amazed on how a spam-bot can, at first glance, sound like a real person. The spam-bot uses correct syntax (roughly) and correct semantics, however it’s clearly not perfect. The email consists of some major pragmatic violations (who looks for love by randomly emailing someone on the Internet?!)… realistically when you realize that you never sent a request for marriage over the Internet to any Ethiopian website you immediately know that it’s a spam-bot.

Oh well… hope you enjoy it…

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October 28, 2009  Tags:   Posted in: language, Linguistics